• Archive for February, 2014

    The Power of Art – Holocaust Survivor Sara Atzmon’s Hong Kong Exhibition

    by  • 25/02/2014 • Education, Events, History, Holocaust, News • 0 Comments

    IMG_9726                 Hair, 1996

    An exhibition preview of Surviving Evil- The Pictorial Language of Sara Atzmon was held on 25 February 2014 at the University Museum and Art Gallery of The University of Hong Kong. The exhibition was a result of the incredible collaboration of the Hong Kong Holocaust and Tolerance Center (HKHTC), the Goethe-Institut Hongkong and the University of Hong Kong Museum and Art Gallery.

    IMG_9714                 Jeremy Amias, Chairman of the HKHTC openning address

    IMG_9724

    And while Sara Atzmon's art certainly spoke for itself, she was also present to deliver a moving and powerful address that detailed her journey from her childhood in Hungary, through the horrors of the Holocaust and then ultimately to Israel. Her speech was presented in Hebrew and later translated as she explained that the language of Hebrew must be heard outside of Israel also. 

    Atzmon explained in her speech and through her art that "the pain is constantly there" and she spoke of the difficulty of openning old wounds. Her work is a haunting reminder of the devestation suffered and a powerful call for rememberance.

    IMG_9718                 Sara Atzmon

    Consul General of the State of Israel in Hong Kong Sagi Karni, in his address, reminded that our culture is built on memory. He pointed to the irony of the openning of this exhibition in Hong Kong while hundreds of copies of Anne Frank's diary have been destroyed in Tokyo. This further speaks to the importance of such an exhibition in the Far East.

    IMG_9733                  Eyes in the Wire, 1990

    Surviving Evil – The Pictorial Languague of Sara Atzmon runs from February 26th through May 4th at the University Museum and Art Gallery on 90 Bonham Road from 9:30-18:00 on Mondays through Saturdays and from 13:00-18:00 on Sundays. 

     

     

     

     

     

    A Glimpse of Jewish Harbin

    by  • 11/02/2014 • Communities, History • 1 Comment

    Harbin, China, today the capital of Heilongjiang Province, while perhaps best known for its Ice Festival, was once known as the “Moscow of the East.” At its height it was also home to over 23,000 Jews (including the grandparents of former prime minister Ehud Olmert) who created their own rich religious, cultural and educational life.

    Even though the last Jewish family left Harbin in 1963 and Judaism isn’t a recognized religion in China, two historic synagogues (the Main/Old and the New Synagogues) as well as various other Jewish institutions, have physically, in some form, seem to have stood the test of time — without Jews.

    CIMG0801              Main (Old) Synagogue

    CIMG0767              Former Jewish School

     

    B10 - Jewish Buildings - New Synagogue              New Synagogue

    C5 - Cemetery - Chapel                Jewish Cemetery Chapel

    C53 - Cemetery - Solomon Kadish & Girsh Kruglakov             Jewish Cemetery

    B1 - Jewish Buildings - Private Hospital                Former Jewish Hospital

    CIMG0783